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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflective -- you tell me. did the house change? >> it is a reflection of polarization that takes place at a leadership level. party loyalty is importa
was in the wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and the house and senate were safely democrat hands. with the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control of the white house and the senate. but in the house where newt gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman whose author was only steps away from newt's. i can history of our representatives like newt, the minority was often a lonely place. the republicans had held the majority there since 1954 and there was not a soul alive who could ever imagine the republican majority again. except for newt. there's no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, dedication and mind filled with ideas. it is newt gingrich or sat in the back benches of congress and methodically devised a strategy over several years to make the republican party party of ideas once again. in this newt who devised the famous contract with america. a plan that gave republicans more to run against in historic 1994 elections. he gives them something to run for. in this newt to rally the faithful behin
was in wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and both the house and senate were safefully democrat hands. the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control bows the white house and the senate. in the house, where gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman who had an office steps away from newt's. can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was off in a lonely place. the republicans hasn't held a majority there since 1956. there was not a soul alive that could imagine a republican majority again. oh. except for newt. [laughter] with no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, a vision, and a mind filled with idea, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back bench of congress and meth devised a -- once again. it was gingrich that devised the famous contract with america. the plan that gave republicans more than something to run against in the historic 1994 election. he gave them something to run for. it was gingrich who rallied the faithful behind the ideas and took back the house after forty years in the
conservative wilderness. but it matters what they do. look at jared bernstein put together today. you know they just revised the number for economic growth for the country for the last quarter. they just revised it today. and it was a good revision. it was a revision upwards. so the third quarter, this last quarter this year we were growing at a rate of 3.1%. it's up almost two points from the quarter before. if they don't get their act together, this is what the congressional budget office says is going to happen to the economic growth rate this quarter. 2%. and look what happens next quarter, the first three months of next year. that's bad. maybe as hourtd dean was saying with ed tonight, maybe we can endure that and we'll come back stronger than ever. but that's bad. that is an economic catastrophe that will hurt a lot of americans for a long time. and maybe you want to bear that brunt. but maybe that happening accidentally because of so much chaos on one side that they can't tell which way's up, which way's down and who's on their own side is not the way to get that. this is like being
, his party, like the republican party today, was in the wilderness. the jimmy carter occupied the white house, and both the house and senate were safely in democratic hands. but with the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took both the house and the senate. but in the house, where newt gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. now, i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman's office who was only steps away from newt, and i can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was often a lonely place. the republicans had not held the majority there since 1954, and it was not a soul alive who could ever imagine a republican majority again. oh, except for newt. with no seniority but a tireless work ethic, a vision and a mind filled with ideas, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back benches of congress and methodically devise a strategy over several years to make the republican party a party of ideas once again. it was newt edifies the famous contract with america. plan to give republicans more than something to run against the historic 1944 election
about the romney campaign. fred wilder asks i wonder if lynn sweet is a cubs or white sox fan. inquiring minds want to know. >> you're on the spot. >> i'm going to try to make this -- >> bill: don't straddle the fence. >> i'm going to tell you i went back to the cubs once "the chicago tribune" sold them. so my allegiance once "the tribune" bought them many years ago and i was in washington. the nats weren't here yet. it was the os. nats were the nats which still have a prime place in my heart but once "the tribune" company bought the cubs, i could go back. once they sold the cubs -- >> bill: you could go back to the cubs. i think that makes sense. >> i had to and i could not -- somebody might say why not go to the white sox. i will quickly tell you the answer. many years ago the white sox did a deal in springfield illinois, the capital where they got -- i thought it was under the radar deal to get funding for their new stadium. and i don't like under the radar deals so i couldn't go to them because that wa
-term unemployment. secondly, there's clearly some immediate still a gap issues. you hear it in wilders, engineers, and we should be focused on that. third and perhaps most importantly, the long-term issue, which is really more, since we're talking about the future -- it is less of the current skill set and more of a supply-side issue. we should believe that if we have a large enough supply of skilled workers in the field of dreams notion that if we have the degree of skilled workers, it will help location of jobs to come here and we will be more of a magnet for the high skilled jobs of the future. i think that when we are looking at this, though, we should in our policy solutions make sure we are defining policies right said that we are having the right solutions. sometimes when people say "skill gaps, close to what they're talking about the absolute top of the top engineers and physicians. those people we talk about helping to address right now with high skilled immigration, others are talking about the supply of stem workers in our country -- science, technology, engineering, and mathematical w
about the carnage and the lives lost, the great battle before in fredericksburg and the wilderness. you talk about antietam and you talk about shiloh, manassas, all these battles people defending what they think, a way of life for slavery or what have you, all of that, all that bloodshed settle this contradiction. and we won. we have our country. and i like to go to gettysburg to say to my clerks, do we deserve this? do we deserve the sacrifice for the country that we have and are we living up to that? are we doing our part? >> just go anyplace. think of the people at the battle of the bulge or think of them at you know, during any war and just ask yourself, you know, let's assume without debating whether you should have had this, that, this war that, we have done our part and the thing i was told, was going to be a priest. that was really the only sort of goal that i had. what is a priest? you are called to do something. every ex-seminarian it's all nice like -- your call now is to do your part. to be able to earn the right to be here. >> you can mention in your book very prominently o
in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. in turn, it is significant for the american public to know that appropriations committees work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflective -- you tell me. did the house change? >> it is a reflection of polarization that takes place at a leadership level. par
a bond company and they sold it to a bigger company. she went away into the wilderness. she's now founded her company again. >> she's men a plbeen a player while, significant in other own right. >> she's a remarkable woman. >> municipal bonds has everything to do with things we've been talking about in terms of financial health of the states, which is not great. you have to go state by state and make sure that you know what you're doing. you know, she's obviously the biggest proponent. i wish she'd start doing those commercials again. >> exactly. >> those things were so cool. iconic. >> they were. i love her. >> andy, you've come out with top picks from star investors. technology. >> these are, again, sort of out-of-the-box picks. align makes those invisible braces for your teeth. >> invisalign. >> i was thinking of getting those, yeah. >> and those things are really huge. pentair makes water filtration systems, obviously, you know, globally. that's an incredible business right now. water is a precious commodity. public storage is exactly what it sounds like, all those storage containers.
their destination into a desert wilderness. some folkings were stranded for a day without food or water. apple has told cnn its working very hard to fix its maps. i think that goes to show it never hurts to have the old handy dandy real physical map in your hand. >> somebody tells you, you make a left turn at this street. >> if you're trying to get into the city and you're amongst the brush, you may have taken a wrong turn somewhere. >>> you may not know her name but she was certainly one of the most influential hispanic women on both sides of the u.s./mexico border. up next, jenni rivera's rise from poverty to superstardom. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to w
house members have spent decades in the wilderness and he was the one that found a way to bring them into the majority in the house. how do you balance the pluses and minuses? >> there is not any question that that effort to paint a picture of jim wright's service laid the foundation for a majority. that was a healthy thing. i do not believe it was a good thing -- we have been in that for far too long. appropriations committees work -- in turn the, i think it is significant for the american public to know the appropriations committee work is where either you spend money or you do not. ideally, you are here to work with one another to be as responsive as possible to your own constituents and taxpayers. within the committee itself, the more we can talk to each other as individuals and human beings, the better off the institution will be. and the more responsive it will be. >> the kinds of organizations that track members' votes, when they look at yours, saw an ad and earlier you more frequently crossed the aisle to vote with democrats. in your later service, 96% rating. is that reflect
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)